A Cannabinoid Stronger than THC

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cannabinoid Stronger than thc

Recent studies found another cannabinoid. According to a 2019 Nature.com Scientific Report, THCP could actually be stronger than THC. Tetrahydrocannabiphorol is actually a phytocannabinoid. By this, I mean that this cannabinoid is exclusively produced by plants. They can come from an array of things, but this one in particular is the most predominant category. At the moment, there are over 80 phytocannabinoids being studied, but cannabis remains the only psychoactive one.

Weedmaps shared the study that more accurately named THCP more active than THC. The European Regional Development Fund sponsored this project from the research fund, UNIHEMP (Use of Industrial Hemp Biomass for Energy and New Biochemicals Production). The group compared THCP to Delta-9 in how it would need to decarboxylate to have any effect, however. 

A team of Italian scientists made the discovery of the cannabinoid with a similar makeup to THC. The experiments measured cannabimimetic activity. This was to see how well it replicated the effects of the better known cannabinoids on the CB1 receptor. THCP is proven to have more cannabimimetic activity which could proven to be psychoactive stronger than THC. Researchers aren’t recommending it due to inconsistencies, however. THC is proven safer and more consistent. While THCP, without diligent research on consistent and quality cannabis may not be the best option. As usual though, the DEA isn’t helping.

Biased Research

Lawmakers on both sides recently demanded the Drug Enforcement Administration to allow more growers to supply in scientific research. Currently, the University of Mississippi handles all federal cannabis research. This is despite being a conservative state that only got medical cannabis on a ballot this year. Most argue for moving the research location or allowing more experienced growers to donate cannabis for that purpose. House members echoed those concerns in a letter to the DEA, stating, 

“It is imperative that lawmakers have scientific evidence about potential medical uses, side effects and societal impacts of cannabis to guide policy decisions.

The only way that can occur is if our academic and clinical researchers are permitted to conduct well-controlled, scientific studies on these materials… To do so, they must have access to federally compliant cannabis and its chemical constituents in sufficient quantity and quality .”

Marijuana Moment

They also brought up the economic effects as the delay held up jobs. At the moment, the DEA is trying to justify the delay after a memo suggesting they monopolize the research, purchase, sale entirely.

Regardless, multiple lawsuits against the DEA are still open. Judges have not made an official decision.

Joycelin Arnold

Joycelin Arnold

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