Amazon Demands Partners Stop Cannabis Testing, Insurance Concerns Arise

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By now everyone has heard of Amazon’s newfound support for cannabis. Over the last few months, the company voiced support and announced the their new policy on drug testing. If that wasn’t enough, they are now one of the biggest lobbyists for federal cannabis legalization. Despite all those efforts, smaller mom-and-pop companies who work with the Amazon are having trouble making the transition for other reasons. 

In June, Amazon began urging its delivery partners to do away with cannabis screening to gain more candidates for employment. Some delivery partners have seen a positive change with the move but most are concerned with the logistics. The change requires all of their third-party vendors to be on board, despite the drastic revenue gaps. Amazon is a multi-billion dollar company, the companies that work with them, however, are not in the same position. As we approach the holiday season in the height of a labor shortage, Amazon is trying to find more ways to outbid the competition. Considering the retail giant pays at least $3 less than the other bidders and requires longer hours, their vendors are fighting back their demands.

STANDING UP TO A RETAIL GIANT

Amazon’s partners are worried about liability with the policy change. “If one of my drivers crashes or kills someone and tests positive for marijuana, that’s my problem, not Amazon’s.” Was the sentiment from one anonymous partner. Amazon discourse vendors and partners from speaking to the media. As a result, most of these forced changes aren’t being discussed openly.

The gravity of the situation came up during a meeting here in Las Vegas. DankCity reported that a hundred delivery business owners sought out a solution for the high demand and the low number of applicants. Here, however, was where the stark comparison between other delivery companies and Amazon came to light. Insurance, liability, and finances are one part of the problem; but, Amazon’s practices are an entirely different conversation.

As we’ve discussed in the past, companies and individuals voicing support for cannabis haven’t always been with the best intentions. As more open consumption usage grows and how much of a priority cannabis accessibility is to those consumers, mainstream support with ulterior motives grows as well. We’ve seen politicians and lawmakers get caught up in the haze of it all; but, the question remains, are they here for the right reasons? With Amazon pushing for their vendors to join them, it could result in more problems than solutions. 

Have you been following Amazon’s cannabis support? How do you think this will change things?

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Joycelin Arnold

Joycelin Arnold

Dating back to 2012, Joycelin has wrote for various online Video Game publications covering events and launches regularly. Cannabis has been with her throughout the journey, however. She officially joined cannabis industry in 2016 as a budtender and begin writing for brands and magazines in 2017. Outside of cannabis, she writes science fiction with one published novel, Siren, so far.

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