For The Terps: Finding the Perfect Terpene

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terpene what is it

If you’ve been to a dispensary, it’s obvious that the weed-game has changed. You can come across a variety of sweets and strains boasted by brands from every niche, each wrapped to perfection with medicinal information, all served by a friendly budtender. Throughout the journey, you may hear a word you don’t know: Terpene.

So, What Are Terpenes?

The old comparison of Sativa and Indica is becoming outdated as cannabis research continues. Terpenoids are the new deciding factor but, what exactly is a terpene. Often referred to as Terps, they give cannabis it’s scent and flavor. There are thousands of Terpenes and each has a distinct attribute and smell and their combinations can produce some amazing effects. If you’re ever wondering what makes your Lemoncello so enticing, look no further.

We recently discussed cannabinoids but terpenes are a different compound. Terpenes enhance the cannabis experience with their individual. In combination with what cannabinoids offer, the overall experience has been recently referred to as the Entourage Effect. This is when the full-plant matter comes together in unison to produce a specific effect.

For this reason, Terpenes and Cannabinoids are just as important factors than THC percentages. The way your body interacts with specific strains can be based more on terpene-tolerance rather than THC-tolerance. So, how do you identify what terpenes we like and need? If you’re out for that perfect smooth hit or a mouth full of fruit, what are you supposed to look for? Check out our breakdown of the most common terpenes for the answer. 

Myrcene

The most commonly enjoyed terpene is Myrcene. Many may not know it, but it happens to be a fan-favorite. Myrcene gives the body a heavy feeling while helping to relieve body pain. That feeling of being ‘stuck’ comes from this terpene. While the taste and smell aren’t the strongest, it can be likened to a rich woodsy aroma. Additionally, myrcene stimulates appetite making it great for those with eating disorders or stomach issues. For those looking for a pain remedy or just a couch-locked sesh with some munchies, myrcene is the way to go.

Limonene

Limonene runs right behind myrcene in popularity; this is due to them being the simplest comparison to Indica and Sativa. Limonene has a citrus lemon taste and smell and effects that match. Opposite of myrcene, Limonene surpasses hunger just as it hypes up most of the body instead of relaxing it. The corresponding attributes are an uplifted mood, a talkative demeanor. It’s a great anti-depressant and anti-stress but, may leave consumers with a case of the giggles. If you’re looking for a little pep in your step or to simply exhale some negativity, look for strains high in Limonene.

Caryophyllene

Caryophyllene is the anti-inflammatory powerhouse. The peppery terpene can oftentimes make for a spicy hit but, the benefits tend to lean more on the medical end. Caryophyllene can put the body at ease, perfect for anyone who is looking to relax without being completely sedated. Be wary though, too much of this type can knock you out for a high-nap. Regardless, it’s still perfect for headaches, body aches, and pains, among a variety of other health issues. This saucy strain will consumers happy, hungry, and hazy every time.

Linalool

If you are looking for sedation, Linalool may be the terpene on your list. It goes hand-in-hand with Myrcene as one of the Purp-Terps with heavily relaxing attributes that can leave you staring off into the distance. Similar to the natural effects of Eucalyptus, Linalool is the weed version here to aid you in insomnia, body pain, depression, and stress. This deep floral terpene is great if you struggle with extreme insomnia and body pain. If you’re looking for a body-trifecta, look for a hearty combination of linalool, myrcene, and caryophyllene.

Pinene

Pinene is a terpene very similar to Limonene with one defining trait. This sweet-pine scented terpene sharpens the focus of users creating a more zoned-in experience. Unlike Limonene, however, Pinene may not be the best option for extremely anxious users as the level of focus can be too strong. Additionally, it lacks some of the anti-inflammatory attributes making it better to avoid if you are suffering from a migraine or a headache. Regardless, this terpene is perfect for an afternoon of errands or a study-sesh with its tunnel vision attributes.

Cannabis Business Times shares this information: “Terpenoids/terpenes, are found in many other plants including spices, herbs, trees, and fruits, and are what give cannabis strains their distinctive smells and flavors…Good evidence shows that secondary compounds in cannabis may enhance the beneficial effects of THC” as well as reduce THC’s unwelcome side effects.” 

These are only a handful of terpenes are more are being discovered as time passes. Always refer back to us for more help identifying cannabinoids and terpenoids. Always ask your budtender for test results or if you have any questions.

Joycelin Arnold

Joycelin Arnold

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